APPLE PIE DECORATION

APPLE PIE DECORATION - ZEBRA TABLE DECORATIONS - DECORATIVE CANDLE STICKS

DECORATING TIPS FOR SMALL ROOMS - DECORATING TIPS FOR


Decorating Tips For Small Rooms - Decor Japonais - Large Wall Decorating Ideas.



Decorating Tips For Small Rooms





decorating tips for small rooms














Italy-13




Italy-13





***note: Jen and I happened upon this scene as we walked down an alley on our way from the Piazza Navona to the Spanish Steps. It seems quintessentially Italian to me.

Day 2
Ahhh, that’s better…no more jet lag. We grabbed a light breakfast of Clif Bars, hopped in a cab and went to the Vatican. Everyone says to get there early before the lines get long, but we didn’t think things would be too bad since the European Holiday just ended and tourism might be down a little bit and thankfully that was the case. I did some reading on the Vatican before we went and the website makes it sound like you have to wear pants and shirts with sleeves and no open-toed shoes. And if you brought a camera you’d have to check it at the door and get it back when you leave. So we dressed up in jeans, sneakers, and nice shirts. I grabbed the compact camera with hopes of sneaking it in and getting some shots surreptitiously and off we went. Did I mention it was mid-90’s every day we were there? Did I? Did I mention we were wearing jeans and nice shirts and sneakers in that mid-90 degree weather? Did I mention that when we got there almost everyone else had on shorts and sandals? No? I haven’t mentioned that yet? How about the fact that everyone had a camera and that no one had to turn it in before going inside? Yeah, we weren’t too happy about that one, either. Anyway, besides all of that, St. Peter’s Basilica is the most amazing building I’ve ever seen. There is no way I can describe it well enough for you to really get a sense of the place. It’s easily 5 stories tall inside, and everything is incredibly ornate. Marble sculptures and statues and paintings and altars adorn every inch. The floor is equally decorated, with several areas roped off to protect the artwork from the trample of feet.

"The first burst of the interior, in all its expansive majesty and glory: and, most of all, the looking up into the Dome; is a sensation never to be forgotten." - Charles Dickens, 1846

The Crypt was something that we could’ve done without, though some may really like it. It houses the tombs of the past popes, all the way back to the first pope, St. Peter. The Basilica was such a breathtaking place that we decided we would visit it again when we returned to Rome on the last day of our trip. Once outside we walked a few blocks away to the Vatican Museum and Sistine Chapel, both of which are worth any line you may have to stand in. Once again, though, we were lucky and didn’t face any lines. We decided to go to the Sistine Chapel first and we’re glad we did. You are required to walk through a series of hallways and rooms and the art that you see on this walk is amazing. The walls are covered in Renaissance art, 30 foot long tapestries, frescoes, and marble sculptures, and the ceiling is painted almost every inch of the way. It is, in its own way, equally as stunning as the Sistine Chapel. You may take your camera with you through this, but you may not take pictures once in the chapel, and you will hear “No Photo!” repeated many times while there. But the beauty of that ceiling will drown out anything else. To stand there and think of Michelangelo laying on his back painting that ceiling, and to realize it took him 4 years to do so…it is truly awe-inspiring.
At this point we were starving, sweaty, and ready to sit down, so we went to a cafe on the corner of Via Santamaura and Via degli Scipioni. This place had the best pizza! Jen got a Margherita pizza, which is basically just cheese, while I got a Neapolitan, which has ham, salami, and mushrooms. We ordered Insalata Pomodoro, which is what we thought was salad with tomatoes. Actually it was just a big bowl of tomatoes, so we learned to order Insalata Mista in the future to get a green salad. We also learned they automatically bring you bread, and then charge you several Euros for it, and many places charge you cover to eat there as well. This pretty much takes the place of tipping though, as there is no spot to include tips when filling in the credit card receipt. After a quick shower and change of clothes the rest of the day was spent walking around Rome (screw the cabs). We visited the Trevi Fountain, the Spanish Steps, had a glass of beer in the Piazza Navona (they have ENORMOUS glasses of beer if you want to pay €15 for one. That translates to about $24, by the way…for a beer. We opted for the smaller glass.) and saw the Pantheon. We found that walking or taking the Metro (€1 per person each way) were much better means of transportation. Dinner was another sidewalk cafe, followed by gelato, a drink and a cigar at the cafe at our hotel.
There are two things I noticed while there that I want to mention in closing. 1) I have never seen so many faux-hawks in my life. Seriously, is it required that you have this type of haircut if you live there and are between the ages of 18 and 30? b) The doors here are MASSIVE. Like 25 feet tall











Italy-11




Italy-11





***note: This is the inside of the Pantheon. A church service was being conducted while visitors milled about. This is not an HDR.

Day 2
Ahhh, that’s better…no more jet lag. We grabbed a light breakfast of Clif Bars, hopped in a cab and went to the Vatican. Everyone says to get there early before the lines get long, but we didn’t think things would be too bad since the European Holiday just ended and tourism might be down a little bit and thankfully that was the case. I did some reading on the Vatican before we went and the website makes it sound like you have to wear pants and shirts with sleeves and no open-toed shoes. And if you brought a camera you’d have to check it at the door and get it back when you leave. So we dressed up in jeans, sneakers, and nice shirts. I grabbed the compact camera with hopes of sneaking it in and getting some shots surreptitiously and off we went. Did I mention it was mid-90’s every day we were there? Did I? Did I mention we were wearing jeans and nice shirts and sneakers in that mid-90 degree weather? Did I mention that when we got there almost everyone else had on shorts and sandals? No? I haven’t mentioned that yet? How about the fact that everyone had a camera and that no one had to turn it in before going inside? Yeah, we weren’t too happy about that one, either. Anyway, besides all of that, St. Peter’s Basilica is the most amazing building I’ve ever seen. There is no way I can describe it well enough for you to really get a sense of the place. It’s easily 5 stories tall inside, and everything is incredibly ornate. Marble sculptures and statues and paintings and altars adorn every inch. The floor is equally decorated, with several areas roped off to protect the artwork from the trample of feet.

"The first burst of the interior, in all its expansive majesty and glory: and, most of all, the looking up into the Dome; is a sensation never to be forgotten." - Charles Dickens, 1846

The Crypt was something that we could’ve done without, though some may really like it. It houses the tombs of the past popes, all the way back to the first pope, St. Peter. The Basilica was such a breathtaking place that we decided we would visit it again when we returned to Rome on the last day of our trip. Once outside we walked a few blocks away to the Vatican Museum and Sistine Chapel, both of which are worth any line you may have to stand in. Once again, though, we were lucky and didn’t face any lines. We decided to go to the Sistine Chapel first and we’re glad we did. You are required to walk through a series of hallways and rooms and the art that you see on this walk is amazing. The walls are covered in Renaissance art, 30 foot long tapestries, frescoes, and marble sculptures, and the ceiling is painted almost every inch of the way. It is, in its own way, equally as stunning as the Sistine Chapel. You may take your camera with you through this, but you may not take pictures once in the chapel, and you will hear “No Photo!” repeated many times while there. But the beauty of that ceiling will drown out anything else. To stand there and think of Michelangelo laying on his back painting that ceiling, and to realize it took him 4 years to do so…it is truly awe-inspiring.
At this point we were starving, sweaty, and ready to sit down, so we went to a cafe on the corner of Via Santamaura and Via degli Scipioni. This place had the best pizza! Jen got a Margherita pizza, which is basically just cheese, while I got a Neapolitan, which has ham, salami, and mushrooms. We ordered Insalata Pomodoro, which is what we thought was salad with tomatoes. Actually it was just a big bowl of tomatoes, so we learned to order Insalata Mista in the future to get a green salad. We also learned they automatically bring you bread, and then charge you several Euros for it, and many places charge you cover to eat there as well. This pretty much takes the place of tipping though, as there is no spot to include tips when filling in the credit card receipt. After a quick shower and change of clothes the rest of the day was spent walking around Rome (screw the cabs). We visited the Trevi Fountain, the Spanish Steps, had a glass of beer in the Piazza Navona (they have ENORMOUS glasses of beer if you want to pay €15 for one. That translates to about $24, by the way…for a beer. We opted for the smaller glass.) and saw the Pantheon. We found that walking or taking the Metro (€1 per person each way) were much better means of transportation. Dinner was another sidewalk cafe, followed by gelato, a drink and a cigar at the cafe at our hotel.
There are two things I noticed while there that I want to mention in closing. 1) I have never seen so many faux-hawks in my life. Seriously, is it required that you have this type of haircut if you live there and are between the ages of 18 and 30? b) The doors here are MASSIVE. Like 25 feet tall massive.

More to come!









decorating tips for small rooms







See also:

nursery decoration

decorating office space

decorating a small entryway

luau table decoration

easter decorations ideas

unique christmas tree decorating ideas

northwoods decorating



  1. (月) 14:51:40|
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DECORATION THEME - THEME


DECORATION THEME - DECORATIVE WINDOW FILM STAINED - HOMEMADE GARDEN DECOR.



Decoration Theme





decoration theme














Orchard Road




Orchard Road





Workers still fixing and installing the decorations along Orchard Road for the light-up on 15 November 2008. This year decoration theme is The Sweet Family with candy canes and other sweets











themes




themes





APPLEBEE'S, Chandler Blvd & Alma School Rd, Chandler









decoration theme







See also:

decorative tension curtain rods

kids room decor ideas

home interior decorating catalogs

ikea decorating ideas

tropical patio decor

window well decor

bathroom decor for kids



  1. (月) 14:51:15|
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DECORATIVE CONVEX MIRROR - DECORATIVE CONVEX


DECORATIVE CONVEX MIRROR - MOOSE LODGE DECOR - FRENCH CAFE DECORATING.



Decorative Convex Mirror





decorative convex mirror














Convex Mirrors-Interior Convex Mirror 600mm x 400mm rectangular Acrylic




Convex Mirrors-Interior Convex Mirror 600mm x 400mm rectangular Acrylic





The Interior Convex Mirror 600mm x 400mm rectangular acrylic eliminates blind spots, is suitable for height restricted application and great for combating the theft of property and valuables. Furthermore, it helps with the prevention accidents and injuries. The mirror can easily be fixed to a wall or ceiling with a ‘J-arm’ bracket mount which allows adjustments to all angles.











Convex Mirrors-Interior Convex Mirror 600mm round Acrylic




Convex Mirrors-Interior Convex Mirror 600mm round Acrylic





The Interior Convex Mirror 600mm round Acrylic eliminates blind spots, is great for combating the theft of property and valuables. Furthermore, it helps with the prevention accidents and injuries. The mirror can easily be fixed to a wall or ceiling with a ‘J-arm’ bracket mount which allows adjustments to all angles.









decorative convex mirror







See also:

black kitchen decor

country french decorating magazine

french bakery decor

lodge bedroom decor

home and garden decorative

decorate wedding tables

heavy metal decor

girls room decorations

home decor catalog shopping

island theme decorations



  1. (月) 14:50:50|
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DISNEY PRINCESS DECOR. PRINCESS DECOR


DISNEY PRINCESS DECOR. DECORATING IDEAS GIRLS. DECORATE KITCHEN WALLS.



Disney Princess Decor





disney princess decor














Princess dresses




Princess dresses





Girls got to choose their own tutus to wear for the party. The party girl wore a princess tiana gown and crown











Candy Buffet




Candy Buffet





Taffy, jelly belly jelly beans and rock candy filled containers on the sweets table









disney princess decor







See also:

how to decorate a room for valentines day

lettering wall decor

free room decorating games

brown zebra decor

tiki hut decorations

arabian decoration

decorating office spaces

tiny decor blog

formal table decor

cowboy decor



  1. (月) 14:50:25|
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EARLY AMERICAN HOME DECOR - HOME DECOR


Early american home decor - Home decorating galleries.



Early American Home Decor





early american home decor














1946 Cadillac Sedan Classic Auto Advertisement




1946 Cadillac Sedan Classic Auto Advertisement





Baby you can drive my car
Yes I'm gonna be a star
Baby you can drive my car
And maybe I'll love you

Beep beep'm beep beep yeah!
-The Beatles

Ending a hurried production run that had begun four years earlier, just after Pearl Harbor the last M-24 tank rolled off the Cadillac assembly line on August 24, 1945. Amazingly the first '46 Caddy was produced on October 7, 1945.
Rectangular parking lights resided on the upper portion of the slightly modified grille (with fewer vertical bars), and wraparound bumpers were adopted front and rear. The front of the hood and the decklid now sported the Cadillac crest nestled in a "V," which would become a long-standing trademark, so the Cadillac block lettering was moved to the front fenders.

1946 Cadillac Dash Strikes and materials shortages, particularly of sheet steel, were major industry-wide problems during the '46 production year. Thus, some Cadillacs went through the assembly lines with only brackets to hold temporary wooden bumpers -- the real ones had to be installed by dealers as they became available later.
Pressure on Cadillac to produce was intense. Even in 1947, there were still almost 100,000 unfilled orders for what one division sales manager, D. E. Ahrens, called "... one of the most sought-after, and most scarce items in the world today." People knew Cadillac's value and prestige, and that was what they wanted, but due to the early postwar difficulties only 29,214 customers got to drive a '46 Caddy home. Those that managed to get one paid for the privilege, as the price-leader Sixty-One fastback now started at $2052, up a whopping 41.5 percent over 1942. The Business Imperial nine-passenger sedan, the most expensive 1946 offering, listed at $4346, up $1266, or 41.1 percent. Of course, pricing was a problem for all automakers in the inflationary days following the war.

This large 10 1/2" x 13 1/2" advertisement is from a 1946 edition of the Saturday Evening Post.











Civil War Major General Henry Wagner Halleck 1863




Civil War Major General Henry Wagner Halleck 1863





Civil War Hero Portrait Engraving From 1863

Henry Wager Halleck (January 16, 1815 – January 9, 1872) was a United States Army officer, scholar, and lawyer. A noted expert in military studies, he was known by a nickname that became derogatory, "Old Brains." He was an important participant in the admission of California as a state and became a successful lawyer and land developer. Early in the American Civil War, he was a senior Union Army commander in the Western Theater and then served for almost two years as general-in-chief of all U.S. armies. He was "kicked upstairs" to be chief of staff of the Army when Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, Halleck's former subordinate in the West, whose battlefield victories did much to advance Halleck's career, replaced him in 1864 as general-in-chief for the remainder of the war.

Halleck was a cautious general who believed strongly in thorough preparations for battle and in the value of defensive fortifications over quick, aggressive action. He was a master of administration, logistics, and the politics necessary at the top of the military hierarchy, but exerted little effective control over field operations from his post in Washington, D.C. President Abraham Lincoln once described him as "little more than a first rate clerk."









early american home decor







See also:

wall decor for girls rooms

fireplace mantle decoration

rustic house decor

decorative hanging mirrors

table centerpiece decor

rod iron decoration

mermaid cake decoration

country decoration

decorative wall shelf brackets



  1. (月) 14:49:56|
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